​​​To view recordings of  2021 programs, click on the graphic below.


This is an in-person program. We look forward to seeing you at the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum.

Attendees are welcome to bring a brown bag lunch to enjoy during the program


 In 1942, as the United States found itself embroiled in a world war, it faced a severe shortage of pilots. In response, two groups of women’s pilots formed, creating civilian groups to ferry planes overseas and free up male pilots for combat missions. These groups merged in 1943 and became the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPs). More than 1,000 pilots, all volunteers, ultimately trained as WASPs and flew almost every type of military aircraft. Catherine Parker kept various charts, instructions, and certificates from her time as a WASP, including her individual flight records.

Join Felicia Williamson, Director of Library and Archives, to learn more about WASPs through selected artifacts from the Catherine Parker Chatham Family Collection in the Museum’s archives. 



Click on

graphic  to view the recording.

POSTPONED

DUE TO

ILLNESS

2022 Programs

         

          SUNDAY, MARCH 27,

          1:00 PM CST

          Teaching Antisemitism: The Challenges


          Presented by Dr. Charles Asher Small


​​In keeping with his devotion to the fight against antisemitism,

Dr. Charles Asher Small explores the challenges confronting educators

who would bring that battle to the schools on all levels. In doing so

he sounds a warning to us all in this time of increasing antisemitism.

Dr. Charles Asher Small is the Founder and Executive Director of the

Institute for the Study of Global Antisemitism and Policy {ISAP) and the

Director of the ISGAP-Woolf Institute Fellowship Training Programme

on Critical Antisemitism Studies at Cambridge.


​​​​​​

IN PERSON PROGRAM​

We’re partnering with the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum

for their latest special exhibition program.

Historian and author Stephanie D. Hinnershitz will discuss

how the U.S. government wrongfully imprisoned

tens of thousands of Japanese American citizens

between 1942 and 1945 and profited from their labor – all

in the name of national security.

This program will be held in person at the Museum

300 N. Houston Street, Dallas, Texas 75202.
























Click on graphic     to view the recording.

SUNDAY, MARCH 20, 1:00 PM CST
The Threats to Diaspora Jews from the World and from Within


presented by Melanie Phillips


Noted social commentator Melanie Phillips presents her unique insights into the challenges facing Jews in their distinctive situation in the Diaspora. She explains how and why challenges, with all the dangers they pose, come both from within

the Jewish community and from beyond it.

Journalist, broadcaster and author, Melanie Phillips is Britain's best known champion of traditional values in the cul- ture war. She authors a weekly column for

The Times of London and also writes for the Jewish News Syndicate and

is a regular panelist on BBC Radio's The Moral Maze.


​CLICK GRAPHIC TO VIEW RECORDING

Partnering with the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum

21 Programs

HISTORY HIGHLIGHTS: NETWORK OF MASS MURDER - THE NAZI CONCENTRATION CAMPS

Partnering with Congregation NishmatAm










CRUCIAL CONVERSATIONS:

CHALLENGING AAPI HATRED 


THE PAST, PART 1

VIRTUAL

Wednesday, May 4, 2022

7:00 PM CT


In the first session of this series,

we will focus on the history of

Asian Americans and

Pacific Islanders (AAPI)

in the United States,

including the journeys

of immigrants and refugees from

different regions of Asia,

anti-AAPI legislation, and challenges faced

and overcome by AAPI communities.



​​IN PERSON PROGRAM​​

We’re partnering with the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum
for their latest special exhibition program.
Historian and author Stephanie D. Hinnershitz will discuss
how the U.S. government wrongfully imprisoned
tens of thousands of Japanese American citizens
between 1942 and 1945 and profited from their labor – all
in the name of national security.


This program will be held in person at the Museum
300 N. Houston Street, Dallas, Texas 75202.
To get your tickets, register here.





















































Yom HaShoah Commemoration


Wednesday, April 27 | 7:15pm CT

In person at Congregation Shearith Israel

 

Yom HaShoah, also known as Holocaust Remembrance Day, commemorates the six million Jews who were murdered in the Holocaust and celebrates the lives of those who survived.

Join the Dallas-area community to reflect upon this tragedy, remember those who perished, and honor our Survivors.​​
 

Between 1933 and 1945, Nazi Germany and its allies established more than 44,000 camps and ghettos across occupied Europe. This vast network of camps served several purposes for the Nazis, including to segregate Jews, create sites for forced labor, and implement their ultimate plan of mass murder. This system required careful planning and a vast administration, at which coldly calculating Nazi leaders excelled.

 Join Dr. Charlotte Decoster, Ackerman Family Director of Education, for a discussion of the Nazi camp network during the Holocaust. 


TUESDAY - MAY 10TH - 7PM

VIRTIAL PROGRAM - REGISTRATION REGUIRED

VIRTUAL PROGRAM


Join our friends at the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum for their Movie Monday discussion of the film Who Will Write Our History. This film tells the story of a secret band of journalists, scholars, and community leaders who decided to fight back while forced to live in the Warsaw Ghetto. Led by historian Emanuel Ringelblum and known by the code name Oyneg Shabbos, this clandestine group vowed to defeat Nazi lies and propaganda not with guns or fists but with the ultimate weapon: the truth.


Program is Complimentary.  Registration Required.


Traded to the Enemy:

A Conversation with Wes Wesselhoeft


POSTPONED DUE TO ILLNESS


In person at the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum


On December 12, 1942, the Crystal City

Family Internment Camp opened in Crystal City, Texas.

A direct result of Executive Order 9066,

which authorized the incarceration of anyone deemed

a threat to national security, Wes Wesselhoeft,

an American citizen born to German immigrants,

was taken with his family from their Chicago home

and put on a train to Crystal City.

A year later, Wes and his family were sent to Germany, traded for American prisoners of war.


Register today to hear Wes tell his story in person at the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum.

300 N. Houston Street | ​Dallas, Texas 75202


Southwest Jewish Congress